Reformation 500 – Community Event

This coming Sunday, October 29, Trinity will be hosting a celebration of the 500th anniversary of the Reformation from 2-4 pm. There will be a more formal program for about the first hour or so and then a time for exhibits, refreshments, and some giveaways in the second hour. Come join us and bring a friend!

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Posted in Calendar Events

Daily Bible Readings – Week 55

Daily Bible Readings
Week 55: October 16-21, 2017

❏ Monday Psalms 126-134
❏ Tuesday Psalms 135-137
❏ Wednesday Psalms 138-143
❏ Thursday Psalms 144-150
❏ Friday John 1:1-2:25
❏ Saturday John 3:1-36

Note that the readings are assigned from Monday to Saturday, leaving Sunday as the day to catch up, and also indicating that we will be corporately hearing the Word at church. The following questions are optional, for your personal growth.

Study Questions: Week 55

1. The Psalms are, among other things, prayers addressed to God, as indeed all hymns are. As you read through the Psalms for this week, consider in which events and circumstances in life these might become your prayers; and consider how our Lord Jesus used these as prayers as part of His earthly ministry.

2. Psalms 126-134 are the remainder of the psalms of ascent. What sort of themes are found in these psalms?

3. What conquest does Psalm 135 recall?

4. The word for “steadfast love” or “lovingkindness” in Psalm 136 is the Hebrew word chesed. It speaks of love, of kindness, but most of all, of covenant-faithfulness. How reassuring is it to know that God’s faithfulness to you, based on the covenant of Christ’s blood, endures forever?

5. What does Psalm 139 teach about God’s knowledge of human life?

6. Who wrote Psalms 138-145?

7. What is the theme of the final five psalms? Why is this a fitting way to close out the Psalter?

8. The Gospel of John takes a completely different tack in its approach to the life of Jesus from the other Gospels. Where Matthew, Mark, and Luke tell a lot of shorter stories, John’s Gospel is primarily built on longer stories, and records much more of Jesus’ dialogue and teaching. As we work through John’s Gospel over the next couple of weeks, you will no doubt notice many familiar stories and verses!

9. What does John 1:1-18 assert about who Jesus is and what He came to do? How does the witness of John the Baptist in John 1:29 reinforce this?

10. Whose disciples were Andrew and John before they became Jesus’ disciples?

11. What was Jesus’ first miracle?

12. Why does Jesus drive the moneychangers and animal sellers out of the temple?

13. How does Jesus foreshadow His death on the cross in His discussion with Nicodemus in John 3?

14. What witness does John the Baptist give about Jesus to his own disciples who were jealous of Jesus?

Posted in Bible Readings

Daily Bible Readings- Week 54

Daily Bible Readings
Week 54: October 9-14, 2017

❏ Monday Psalms 96-101
❏ Tuesday Psalms 102-106
❏ Wednesday Psalms 107-113
❏ Thursday Psalms 114-118
❏ Friday Psalm 119
❏ Saturday Psalms 120-125

Note that the readings are assigned from Monday to Saturday, leaving Sunday as the day to catch up, and also indicating that we will be corporately hearing the Word at church. The following questions are optional, for your personal growth.

Study Questions: Week 54

1. The Psalms are, among other things, prayers addressed to God, as indeed all hymns are. As you read through the Psalms for this week, consider in which events and circumstances in life these might become your prayers; and consider how our Lord Jesus used these as prayers as part of His earthly ministry.

2. The first group of psalms for this week involve “singing”. The Psalms were originally written to be sung, though the tunes have long since disappeared in time. What value is there to singing to the Lord as well as speaking to Him in prayer?

3. Psalm 102 is one of the “penitential psalms”; how does this psalm express sorrow for sin and hope in the Lord?

4. Psalms 103-106 end book 4 of the psalms, and share a common theme of blessing, praising, and thanking the Lord for what He has done. What are some of the things the Lord has done for His people, according to these psalms?

5. From what circumstances does the Lord rescue people in Psalm 107?

6. How is Psalm 110 a prophecy of Jesus?

7. Psalms 113-118 are called the Egyptian Hallel. Psalms 113-14 were sung before the Passover dinner, and Psalms 115-118 afterward. How do these psalms reflect the theme of deliverance from Egypt and from evil in general?

8. Psalm 117 is the shortest psalm. What is it about?

9. Psalm 119 is a special psalm; both the longest psalm in the psalter, and also a collection of shorter alphabetically themed psalms — 22 sections of 8 verses each; each verse within each section begins with the same letter of the Hebrew alphabet, which many English Bibles will list above each section. What is the overall theme of Psalm 119?

10. Psalms 120-125 begin the “psalms of ascent”— psalms that were used as the Israelites ascended to Jerusalem and/or up the steps into the temple. What do you notice about the length of the psalms of ascent, in general?

Posted in Bible Readings

Daily Bible Readings – Week 53

My apologies for posting these late.

Daily Bible Readings
Week 53: October 2-7, 2017

❏ Monday Psalms 61-66
❏ Tuesday Psalms 67-72
❏ Wednesday Psalms 73-77
❏ Thursday Psalms 78-82
❏ Friday Psalms 83-89
❏ Saturday Psalms 90-95

Note that the readings are assigned from Monday to Saturday, leaving Sunday as the day to catch up, and also indicating that we will be corporately hearing the Word at church. The following questions are optional, for your personal growth.

Study Questions: Week 53

1. The Psalms are, among other things, prayers addressed to God, as indeed all hymns are. As you read through the Psalms for this week, consider in which events and circumstances in life these might become your prayers; and consider how our Lord Jesus used these as prayers as part of His earthly ministry.

2. Psalm 63 appears to have been written when David, through his own fault, is on the run from Absalom. Even in the midst of that trial, where is David’s hope?

3. What festival does Psalm 67 reflect?

4. Psalms 69-71 all share a theme; what is it?

5. How does Psalm 74 bring to mind Job’s laments?

6. What history does Psalm 78 recount?

7. Most psalms of lament end with a note of hope and trust in the Lord. What is different about Psalm 88? How does this reflect the darkness of depression?

8. Who composed most of the psalms of book 3 of the Psalms (73-89)?

9. Psalm 90 is possibly one of the oldest psalms, as it was originally composed by Moses. What familiar hymn is based on Psalm 90?

10. How is Psalm 91 misused in the New Testament? (Hint: think of Jesus in the wilderness.)

11. The first half of Psalm 95 is often used as a canticle— a piece of Scripture which is sung rather than spoken— in Christian circles (see, for instance, the services of Matins and Morning Prayer in the hymnal). How does this psalm invite us to worship the Lord yet also warn against false worship?

12. Congratulations! You’re over halfway done the 2-year Bible read-through. God’s Word has a lot of interesting parts to it; hopefully your study so far has opened up some new things for you.

Posted in Bible Readings

Daily Bible Readings – Week 52

Daily Bible Readings
Week 52: September 25-30, 2017

❏ Monday Psalms 23-28
❏ Tuesday Psalms 29-34
❏ Wednesday Psalms 35-41
❏ Thursday Psalms 42-47
❏ Friday Psalms 48-53
❏ Saturday Psalms 54-60

Note that the readings are assigned from Monday to Saturday, leaving Sunday as the day to catch up, and also indicating that we will be corporately hearing the Word at church. The following questions are optional, for your personal growth.

Study Questions: Week 52

1. Why do you think Psalm 23 has had such enduring popularity as a Psalm?

2. What sort of themes do you see in Psalms 24-28?

3. What does the voice of the Lord do, according to Psalm 29?

4. Why is Psalm 32 a good psalm to use when struggling with sin?

5. How does Psalm 34:19-20 prophesy Jesus’ death on the cross?

6. Psalm 35 is one of the imprecatory psalms. These are psalms of anger, calling out curses on the Lord’s enemies. They can be hard to read, but what does the existence of these psalms as part of the inspired Scripture show us about the importance of praying to God even when we are angry?

7. Psalm 38 is an example of a Hebrew acrostic poem. These are virtually impossible to translate into English in acrostic form. Each verse begins with the next letter of the Hebrew alphabet, going from aleph (א) to taw (ת) (equivalent to our a-z). What is the theme of this psalm?

8. The Book of Psalms is really a compilation of five books of psalms. How does the first book end?

9. Psalms 42 and 43 echo a common theme. What is that theme?

10. Who are the Sons of Korah, writers of many of the psalms in Book 2? (See 1 Chronicles 6, and carefully look at the family tree of Heman in verses 33–38.)

11. What reformation hymn is based on Psalm 46?

12. Who is Asaph? (See 1 Chronicles 15:16-24.)

13. Sometimes the ascriptions to the psalms give us background to when they were written. What do we learn about psalms 51, 52, 54, 56, 57, 59, and 60 from their ascriptions? (Feel free to review 1 & 2 Samuel as you read these psalms!)

Posted in Bible Readings

Sermon for September 24, 2017

It’s Not Fair! — Matthew 20:1-16

Preacher: Pastor Alex Klages

Recorded at Trinity, Winkler

Posted in Sermons

Sermon for September 17, 2017

You’re Not Who You Think You Are — Romans 14:1-12

Preacher: Vicar Lief Mauricio

Recorded at Zion, Morden

Posted in Sermons

Daily Bible Readings – Week 51

Daily Bible Readings
Week 51: September 18-23, 2017

❏ Monday Job 38:1-41:34
❏ Tuesday Job 42:1-17
❏ Wednesday Psalms 1-6
❏ Thursday Psalms 7-11
❏ Friday Psalms 12-17
❏ Saturday Psalms 18-22

Note that the readings are assigned from Monday to Saturday, leaving Sunday as the day to catch up, and also indicating that we will be corporately hearing the Word at church. The following questions are optional, for your personal growth.

Study Questions: Week 51

1. God shows up to answer Job and his friends. How does God respond to Job’s many requests and complaints?

2. How does Job respond in chapter 40, now that God is answering him?

3. Behemoth and Leviathan—both of which have been variously explained— are two examples of the Lord’s marvellous work of creation. How does Job respond to the Lord’s second speech?

4. Does God ever answer Job’s questions of why bad things happened to him?

5. How does Job intercede for his friends?

6. How does the Lord restore Job’s fortunes?

7. A note on reading the Psalms: The Psalms are the hymnal of the Old Testament. As such, they tend to be grouped by theme and author. Having said that, there is no narrative to them, and, like a hymnal, they are sourced from various writers spanning a great deal of time; from Moses to around Ezra’s day. King David is one of the most prolific psalmwriters. Psalm 1 forms a fitting introduction to the collection of hymns.

8. Psalm 2 is the first Messianic psalms—that is, it prophesies Jesus. Where in this psalm is there a prophecy of Jesus?

9. What is the theme of psalms 3-6?

10. David’s psalms often contain a complaint against the unrighteous and a call for God to act. How is this different from the book of Job?

11. The phrase “the law of the Lord” speaks of more than just “Law” per se. The term “law” in Hebrew is torah, which refers to the written Word of God— in David’s day, primarily the Books of Moses, which contained law but also gospel. Psalm 19 uses this phrase along with several others to denote how wonderful God’s Word is.

12. When does Jesus quote Psalm 22? How is this an appropriate psalm for use in Holy Week, especially Maundy Thursday and Good Friday?

Posted in Bible Readings

Daily Bible Readings – Week 50

Daily Bible Readings
Week 50: September 11-16, 2017

❏ Monday Job 20:1-21:34
❏ Tuesday Job 22:1-24:25
❏ Wednesday Job 25:1-28:28
❏ Thursday Job 29:1-31:40
❏ Friday Job 32:1-34:37
❏ Saturday Job 35:1-37:24

Note that the readings are assigned from Monday to Saturday, leaving Sunday as the day to catch up, and also indicating that we will be corporately hearing the Word at church. The following questions are optional, for your personal growth.

Study Questions: Week 50

1. Zophar claims that the wicked get their punishment for wickedness in this life. Job, in ch 21, says that just isn’t so. Which view better fits the world we see?

2. Eliphaz declares that Job’s suffering is because he must be a wicked, evil man. Job instead claims to follow the Lord’s laws. What does Job demand of God?

3. Job maintains he has done nothing to deserve what is happening to him. Bildad undercuts this in the brief chapter 25. Is Bildad’s statement right? Why doesn’t it help Job?

4. What is wisdom and understanding?

5. Job makes one final plea to God to hear his case. He points out that, to the best of his knowledge, he has followed God. How does Job’s language here reflect on his faith in God?

6. Why does Elihu feel a need to jump in?

7. Has Job been trying to justify himself rather than God?

8. Elihu also falls into the same pattern as Job’s other counsellors, accusing Job of being wicked, but on one ground, primarily; what is the ground on which Elihu accuses Job of wickedness?

9. The picture of God which Elihu and the other counsellors have given is one of God as Almighty, powerful, and just. Which characteristics of God are missing from the picture, generally speaking? (See Exodus 34:6-7)

Posted in Bible Readings

Sermon for September 3, 2017

Taking Up The Cross — Matthew 16:21-28

Preacher: Pastor Alex Klages

Recorded at Trinity, Winkler

Posted in Sermons